Kiss Hunting Goodbye: The Animal Rights Radicals and Their ‘Rewilding’ Wet Dream

10277910_10152792556247907_4875529979585721361_nEditor’s Note: Hunter, trapper and fisher: your hobby, livelihood and organic protein resource is being threatened on countless levels. Check out how the earth-muffins are planning to change the circle-of-life.

There is an organized jihad being waged by radical environmental and animal rights activists against hunting, fishing, and trapping.  Some of this push is overt, while other efforts are subtle yet equally sinister.

These radical groups hope to substitute natural resource harvesting activities (such as hunting) by humans as the long-standing preferred method of wildlife management, and to instead adopt a new approach incorporating a theoretical but unrealistic natural predator-prey environmental balance.

In their fantasy this balance would be “naturally” self-regulating, would bring the eco-system into harmony, and would make hunting unnecessary.

This contrasting natural resource management model is commonly known as “conservation biology” or euphemistically “rewilding.”  The rewilding model rejects the traditional and centuries-old North American Model of Wildlife Management that intimately incorporates [low cost] consumptive-users (such as hunters) into the process of managing natural resources and wildlife.

It’s the radical environmentalists’ utopian “Circle of Life.” But without humans in the circle.

Proponents of the worldview that rejects the North American Model of Wildlife Management are cunning in their approach to getting their agenda adopted.  They start by advocating “conservation biology” to certain pre-disposed scientists, and they encourage those “scientists” to become activists of the approach rather than neutral observers and reporters.  These scientists-turned-activists then argue that the very human-designed natural conservation activities that have saved and preserved most wildlife species[1] should be tossed out and replaced with their view of a “natural ecological system” approach to wildlife management. Under their approach predators like coyotes, wolves, mountain lions, bears and mesopredators[2] are counted on to thrive in dramatically increased numbers by preying on deer, elk, moose, small game herds, and even on livestock.

In perhaps the most stunning admission that human intervention can’t realistically be avoided when managing wildlife in the civilized world, the rewilders have a backup plan if the predators don’t kill enough game animals: put wildlife on birth control ( http://tiny.cc/8dbkjx ) . The Human Society of the United States (HSUS) says publicly that: “Hunting isn’t the answer. PZP contraception is a humane way to control the populations of deer and other wildlife.”

Carefully packaged, “rewilding” approach actually appeals to some susceptible outdoor enthusiasts – that is, until they discover that this scheme dramatically increases the numbers of many animals considered varmints or threats to humans, and minimizes or eliminates access to public land and the availability of game that can be taken by hunters.

Oh, and they also discover that a truly rewilded “nature” full of larger populations of predator species is a very dangerous place for humans.

All this in the name of protecting the proponents’ favored “keystone” predator species.

The Rewilding Agenda

The details of this extravagant theory were first laid out by Earth First co-founder David Foreman. In his book, Rewilding North America ( http://tiny.cc/hkbkjx ) , he says:

“Specific actions that best meet my criteria for continental-scale conservation are the following:

  • Reintroduce carnivores wherever possible
  • Reintroduce beavers and other highly interactive species
  • Establish species recovery goals for ecologically effective populations
  • Generally halt all predator and “pest” control
  • Reform wildlife management to adopt a more ecological approach
  • Select and design new wilderness areas based on ecological principles
  • Protect all large roadless areas on public lands
  • Create larger roadless areas in the East
  • Remove livestock from much of the public lands
  • Reform livestock grazing where it continues
  • Prioritize simple soil and gully erosion control
  • Prohibit big tree logging
  • Develop standards for ecological restoration in wilderness areas
  • Remove abandoned and unnecessary livestock fencing
  • Restrict all motorized vehicles to designated routes
  • Reduce the miles of public lands roads
  • Stop bogus R.S. 2477 (highway right-of-way) claims
  • Establish landscape permeability as a public land management goal
  • Identify and remove or mitigate barriers to wildlife movement
    • Encourage ecological management of private, corporate, and tribal lands important for linkages
  • Identify private lands that should be acquired on a willing-seller basis
  • Restore a natural fire ecology
  • Remove destructive, unnecessary dams
  • Restore or mimic natural, over-the-bank flooding, where possible
  • Establish in-stream flow as a beneficial water use
  • Prioritize removal of exotic species that threaten native species and wildlands
  • Design networks for climate change . . . .”

This article continues at Ammoland.com

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