Simple Economics: 14-Year-Old Proves U.S. Can Save $370 Million By Changing Fonts

Screenshot 2014-03-29 at 9.57.35 AMFont nerds, get ready to rejoice. Typefaces aren’t just fun — finding the right one could make a huge difference to the nation’s bottom line.

Changing the standard typeface used by federal and state governments could save the United States roughly $370 million a year in ink costs, according to a peer-reviewed study by Suvir Mirchandani. The best part of the story? Mirchandani is just 14 years old.

It all started when Mirchandani, a student at Dorseyville Middle School near Pittsburgh, Pa., noticed that he was getting a lot more printed handouts in class than he used to in elementary school. He wondered how wasteful it was, and then discovered just how expensive ink is. At up to $75 an ounce, he points out, it’s twice as expensive as Chanel No. 5 perfume.

Using software called APFill Ink Coverage, he calculated how much ink was used in four representative fonts — Century Gothic, Comic Sans, Garamond and the default choice of most word processors, Times New Roman.

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The ink-preserving winner: Garamond.

This article continues at mashable.com

 

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